Seúl da marcha atrás en levantamiento de sanciones al Norte • Seoul backs off on lifting sanctions to the North

Seoul backs off on lifting sanctions to the North
The foreign minister retracts and assures that the government has not yet begun the “full” review of the sanctions, on the eve, Trump said South Korea would do nothing without the approval of the EU.

South Korea reversed Thursday’s proposal to lift some of the unilateral sanctions imposed on Pyongyang after the resounding response of US President Donald Trump, who said Seoul could not “do anything” without Washington’s approval. .
Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha said on the eve that Seoul was considering eliminating the measures implemented after a deadly attack in 2010 that killed 46 South Korean sailors. He said his intention was to boost diplomatic efforts for dialogue on North Korea’s nuclear program. South Korean conservatives also reacted with indignation, and Kang’s ministry played down his words later by explaining in a statement that the government had not yet begun the “full” review of the sanctions, meaning there will be no imminent decision.
South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said during a parliamentary audit on Thursday that the withdrawal of sanctions had not been seriously considered and that such an initiative would be complicated unless Pyongyang acknowledges its responsibility in the incident. The North strongly denied having sunk the warship Cheonan.
Trump’s response to being asked about Kang’s remarks showed friction among allies over the advance of the inter-Korean commitment to Washington’s concern that Pyongyang is lagging behind its alleged promise of denuclearization.

“They will not do it without our approval,” the president said. “They do not do anything without our approval.”

South Korea reversed Thursday’s proposal to lift some of the unilateral sanctions imposed on Pyongyang after the resounding response of US President Donald Trump, who said Seoul could not “do anything” without Washington’s approval. .
Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha said on the eve that Seoul was considering eliminating the measures implemented after a deadly attack in 2010 that killed 46 South Korean sailors. He said his intention was to boost diplomatic efforts for dialogue on North Korea’s nuclear program. South Korean conservatives also reacted with indignation, and Kang’s ministry played down his words later by explaining in a statement that the government had not yet begun the “full” review of the sanctions, meaning there will be no imminent decision.
South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said during a parliamentary audit on Thursday that the withdrawal of sanctions had not been seriously considered and that such an initiative would be complicated unless Pyongyang acknowledges its responsibility in the incident. The North strongly denied having sunk the warship Cheonan.
Trump’s response to being asked about Kang’s remarks showed friction among allies over the advance of the inter-Korean commitment to Washington’s concern that Pyongyang is lagging behind its alleged promise of denuclearization.
“They will not do it without our approval,” the president said. “They do not do anything without our approval.”
resume joint travel to the North when possible, expressing optimism that international sanctions will end and allow these projects.

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